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Roman Treasure Found

 

Hi Keith & Rebecca:  

One of my best clients gave me this article today and I thought I would pass it on to you.  Don't know what paper he got it from but was very interesting. Enjoy...

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Also on the topic of metal detecting, Bill was telling me that the University of Texas has literally warehouses full of artifacts that have been found by archeologists that were supposed to write papers on the finds and never have, so there they sit in the dark or in crates and boxes never to be seen by the world. Talk about hypocrites... And they think we little people who find just a few little trinkets are hoarders.  They should look in a mirror.  Sort of like the idea in England that if you find an antiquity the gov't will pay you a fair value for it.  Seems right to me.  They don't care about the common everyday coins,rings etc.  The way it should be.

Hope this finds you all well.  God Bless my friend.  Dale

 

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Metal Detecting Tip (Trees)

Especially you relic hunters, one of the tricks I use the most in hunting, especially relic hunting in wooded areas, is understanding the magnet field that comes off the bottom of my round detector coil creates a cone shape effect and any objects entering that cone shape field will cause my detector to indicate metal under the coil.

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However, when butting the detector coil up against a tree, then the cone shape of the field under my coil is in the direction of away from the tree, thus a great deal of ground is not covered up against the tree itself. Understanding this and that the tree root system will bring up objects from any years ago and which are very deep in the soil, I have learn to simply rock my coil into the tree or slightly tilt my coil towards the tree so to move the cone field of the detector up against the tree and roots below the soil as I swing. This has proven to me many times the unbelievable amount of missed targets other hunters have passed by. Simple swinging your coil up against a tree is not covering all the ground that could hold a precious target or two for you. I know, for two years ago using this trick I found an 1889 Five Dollar Gold Coin. Proof to me that it was worth paying special attention to my swings until it became habit in and around trees to tilt that coil towards the tree slightly as I swing. I have many times come out of the woods with a handful of bullets and my partners had none.

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Where have the Silver Coins gone?

  

Where have the Silver Coins gone?

This is question I’m often asked and many times accused of finding them all, since I started metal detecting for those old coins some 35 years ago in this area.

Yes I remember those days where my father and I would hunt together and find sometimes as many as 20 silver coins each that day, but those days are memories. For today with the increase of the many in our beloved hobby, pockets of lost silver coins are very hard to find, but not impossible.

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I have found like some others that research will allow me to find those long lost sites where folks gathered and lost their silver from their pockets. It is usually sites where nothing is remaining that would show there once stood a town, or school, or saw mill, or better. Here in Northeast Texas the woods are full of such sites, but if you never learn to search for them, talk to ole’ timers or do the research in your local libraries or old newspapers, then you may never find such sites that produce that wonderful old silver coins.

Sure you can still get lucky every now and then and search those out-laying areas that many may not had taken time to look over well and still put out an old silver coin or two yet. I have done it many times even in the hunted-out schools yards around town, but they come far apart in comparison to the many pull tabs and junk you may dig. To find that silver you must find those sites so well hidden that a treasure hunter driving by it would of never known it once was a grand site and folks gathered there regular. Or, you learn to hunt the one site that still gives up the silver over and over again, yet is being covered up by junk everyday----the in-town home site.

Many times I have drove up and down the neighborhoods of the older parts of towns and look for new construction or homes vacated along the way. I will try to find permission and hunt these old house sites and use my experience with my detector to see through the junk and pull out the silver below it. It is not always how deep your detector will find items, but it is how well you know your detector so to understand what it tells you about the next target it finds. If your one of those that changes detectors frequently, then you may have a tough time finding that silver buried in these old yards and house places. If you own a smooth operating detector with ample depth, then learn that detector—work with it so you can understand what the signals it makes is trying to tell you. It really works, for I have seen old guys with 20-year-old detectors run circles around the less experienced hunter with the $1200.00 detector. Take the time to learn, do some research sometime and talk to those ole’ timers out there. Then you’ll start finding those lost silver coins you have been looking for all these years. They were under your feet all this time and you missed them.

Keith Wills

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HOW TO SAVE THAT DETECTOR IF: YOU GAVE IT A BATH AT THE BEACH

HOW TO SAVE THAT DETECTOR IF: YOU GAVE IT A BATH AT THE BEACH.

MANY TH'ERS HAVE HAD THE MIS-FORTUNE OF DROPPING THEIR METAL DETECTOR IN THE SURF OR WATER WHILE HUNTING ON THE BEACH. THIS CAN REALLY PUT A DAMPER ON YOUR WEEKEND, WHEN YOU JUST LOST YOUR ONLY DETECTOR TO HUNT WITH.

WELL DON'T GIVE UP THE SHIP YET! YES, THERE IS HOPE.

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WHEN YOU GO TO THE BEACH OR NEAR THE WATER, YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CARRY A BOTTLE OF DISTILLED ALCOHOL, WHICH YOU CAN BUY AT YOUR LOCAL DRUG STORE. DISTILLED ALCOHOL WILL LEAVE NO RESIDUE ON WHAT IT IS APPLIED TO.

YOU MUST ALWAYS CARRY A SMALL PHILLIPS AND STANDARD SCREWDRIVERS, SO YOU CAN OPEN YOUR DETECTOR IN THE FIELD.

NOW, IF THE WORST HAPPEN AND YOUR DETECTOR NOW LOOKS LIKE A "DROWNED RAT", YOU SHOULD OPEN YOUR DETECTOR IMMEDIATELY. TAKE YOUR BATTERIES OUT AND THROW THEM AWAY, EVEN IF THEY ARE NEW. YOU CAN NOT DEPEND ON THE POSSIBILITY THAT THE BATTERIES, DID NOT LET WATER INSIDE OF THEM. IF THEY DID, THEY COULD POSSIBLY BLOW-UP IN YOUR MACHINE, CAUSING EVEN MORE DAMAGE.

NOW, AFTER DISCARDING THE BATTERIES AND OPENING UP YOUR MACHINE, YOU TAKE THE DISTILLED ALCOHOL AND POUR IT ALL OVER THE CIRCUIT BOARD OF YOUR MACHINE. PLEASE; DO NOT POUR IT INTO THE METER, IF IT HAS ONE.

AFTER POURING THE ALCOHOL OVER THE CIRCUIT BOARD, LAY THE DETECTOR , WHILE OPEN AND CIRCUIT BOARD IS EXPOSED, ON TOP OF YOUR CAR. THIS WILL ALLOW THE HOT SUN LIGHT TO GET TO THE CIRCUIT BOARD AND DRY IT OUT. YOU CAN USE A HAIR DRYER TO DRY IT, IF THERE IS A PLUG-IN CLOSE BY. MOST OF THE TIME THAT IS NOT POSSIBLE.

THE ALCOHOL WILL DISPLACE THE WATER THAT GOT UNDER THE COMPONENTS AND WILL EVAPORATE QUICKLY WITH HEAT OR HOT SUNLIGHT. ONCE DRY { USUALLY TAKES ABOUT AN HOUR }, PUT THE DETECTOR BACK TOGETHER AND INSTALL NEW BATTERIES AND START HUNTING. IF FOR SOME REASON IT STILL DOES NOT WORK, TAKE THE UNIT TO THE REPAIR SHOP. KEITH WILLS

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Indian Clays

Indian Clays

March 1993

Chief Bowles, or "The Bowl" as he was called, was Chief of the Cherokee Tribe in Northeast Texas whose settlements in Texas were near Nacogdoches. A settlement called "Chief Bowles Tribe" according to the Texas Historical marker just South of Henderson was one of the many sights from this area.

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A Mr. E. H. Redding, grandfather to Randy Pope, as a young man around 1920-1930's plowed his crops in a field where these old Indian mounds were located. Randy's grandfather picked up many handmade colored Indian Clay marbles and arrow points as he plowed. He kept these for over 75 years. When he died in 1993 these marbles were a part of his estate handed down to Randy.

The Cherokees remained peaceful as long as their friend Sam Houston was president of the Republic. In June 1839 they were ordered from Texas because of raids and intrigues with Mexican Agents. A two-day battle ensued on the Neches River where their chief was killed on the 2nd day of July 1839 in the Ben Wheeler, Texas area. The Cherokee broke ranks and ran. Texas troops followed the fleeting Indians, chasing them most of the distance to Oklahoma; by the famous trail we call "The Cherokee Trace" outside of Gilmer, Texas.

The Indians called these marbles "Mataw" and they were used as a game of chance or gambling. By holding so many in the hand, then letting them fall to the ground, each player had made their bet as to how many marbles would fall. Maybe even what colors. These colors are softened with algae and slime from stagnant water.

The four different colors I have are: Purple, dyed with pokeberry juice; Red with blackberry juice; Blue with Indiago root and perhaps the Green with pokeberry leaves or ferns. The Yellow Tan ones are probably dyed with mustard seed or yellow blooms of the wild plants.

Randy Pope gave these marbles to my friend Keith Wills and Keith gave them to me so I might put them with my collection. Many thanks to both Randy and Keith and Grandpa for saving them this many years.

Virginia Carroll, Gilmer, Texas

P.S. Virginia Carroll passed away in 2003 and I'm sure her wonderful collection of marbles was handed down to one of the family members that will care for them as Virginia did for so many years. We will remember Virginia for the time she took to come to our treasure club over the years and talk to so many of us about marbles she had collected and helped us identify the ones we would find as well.

Keith Wills

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